Who watches the Watchmen? I did, you shouldn't.

03/09/2009 2:51 pm
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Sunday afternoon Matt, Sarah, and I went to catch a matinee showing of "The Watchmen." Roughly 5 eternities later the credits were finally rolling, and I was as eager to get out of there as I imagine someone being set free from the Hanoi Hilton was, though we could debate who had to suffer the worse torture.

I'll try to keep the spoilers to a minimum while trying to articulate, as best I can, why this movie joined "Very Bad Things" on the list of movies I would have walked out on had I been alone, and is seriously, though I know this is an overused genre of phrases, one of my least favorite movies.

First, as a bit of background, I enjoy Superhero movies, I'm not a comic book reader, but it's not the genre of movies that bothers me. I have not read the graphic novel, and, previous to this movie, had only heard vague references to "The Watchmen."

Back to the movie: First off, the story is told through a series of flashbacks, I didn't keep official stats or anything, but I feel like a good 40% of them did nothing what-so-ever to advance the plot. In general there were a multitude of scenes that had so little to do with anything that splicing in a scene from Batman Begins would have made just as much sense, as long as you could have had Christian Bale wrap up the scene with "Ok, now lets go do ___"

[Mild spoiler alert] The over arching theme of the movie, that humans are too violent/barbaric/selfish/stupid for their own good, and thus need protecting from themselves, has been done to death. It's touted throughout the movie as some monstrously clever observation of the human condition, when in reality it's fairly obvious. It is possible that this was a fresh new idea when the comics were written, but that doesn't change the fact that this is 2009, and the point has been made in Hollywood 3,000 times in the meantime.

[Spoiler alert] There's also a repeated line in the movie of something (everything/life/existence/the universe/Who knows) being a "joke." I guess the joke was lost on me. Unless they were all referring to that completely unnecessary and uncomfortable sex scene, cause someone must have been joking there.

[Big Spoiler Alert] There was also a big reveal and a twist at the end that were so not shocking that I felt confused. When it's revealed to Laurie who her father was I was just like "Wait, we didn't know that? I swear we knew that already. Maybe it's just that SHE didn't know? Then again, this has all the makings of a typical 'dun dun DUNNN!!' movie twist scene."

[Big Ending Spoiler Alert Continued]When the "this guy is being too good" character betrays everyone I was massively underwhelmed. First off, there was heavy foreshadowing. Well, as much as there can be in the 3 minutes of screen time they spent developing the character. You got the feeling that this was supposed to be a "Kevin Spacey is Keyser Soze" type reveal. In reality it was more of a "Kevin Spacey is the killer in Se7en" type reveal, in that you were like "yeah, ok, well, we barely knew him as anything else." To their credit, they did try throwing you off the scent once, and perhaps the story it self isn't as original as they thought. You know the guy is up to no good 2 seconds into his first screen apperance.

In the end I guess as a mid '80s comic book this might have been an original plot, as a 2009 movie I felt like I had already seen it 50 times. Also, I don't need to see that blue dong 200 times.

I did enjoy that all the public figures were real people though.

jeremy.jpgJeremy - 8986 Posts
03/09/2009 @ 03:05:46 PM
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Also, in general, I'd say I enjoyed Rorschach/Walter Kovacs' scenes. Walter Kovacs's scenes especially.
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sarah.jpgSarah - So's your face
03/09/2009 @ 07:01:08 PM
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I don't want to get too into this, but I don't think the movie was horrific, in fact I'm still pondering some of its messages a day later. I don't know if Jeremy and I are interpreting things different or what, but I took different things away from the movie.

I think it was almost a movie about hope. A movie to show that it could be worse. (I know this takes place in 1985, but I think it still applies). (And yes, I know I'm probably stretching here.) Their alternate world is something that could've happened to us. Instead, we've have to go through the tough times to truly appreciate life. If we have superheroes who can just clean up our messes, we've learned nothing and will also start to take freedoms for granted. We also lose our humanity.
There were a few things in the movie that I think I would've appreciated more if I had read the "graphic novel." I did get Zach Snyder's homage to himself at the beginning though.

While this was not the worst movie ever, it was no where close to the Dark Knight.
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Sarah edited this at 03/09/2009 7:10:00 pm
thumbnailCAW1I0O3.gifMatt - Washington Bureau Chief
03/09/2009 @ 07:24:37 PM
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Jeremy Wrote - Today @ 03:05:46 PM
Also, in general, I'd say I enjoyed Rorschach/Walter Kovacs' scenes. Walter Kovacs's scenes especially.


While there is sort of a debate as to who Alan Moore (the writer of the comic) intended to be the hero (if he intended one at all). Rorschach is certainly the most popular character from the book.
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fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - 8986 Posts
03/09/2009 @ 08:33:21 PM
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Sarah Wrote - Today @ 07:01:08 PM
I think it was almost a movie about hope. A movie to show that it could be worse. (I know this takes place in 1985, but I think it still applies). (And yes, I know I'm probably stretching here.) Their alternate world is something that could've happened to us. Instead, we've have to go through the tough times to truly appreciate life. If we have superheroes who can just clean up our messes, we've learned nothing and will also start to take freedoms for granted. We also lose our humanity.
There were a few things in the movie that I think I would've appreciated more if I had read the "graphic novel." I did get Zach Snyder's homage to himself at the beginning though.


I think you're looking too far into it. You can "find a message" in anything. First of all, the heroes did "clean up our mess." If anything the message is that sometimes even bad things are necessary to prevent even worse things, like Hiroshima ending the war, and that there's not always a clear demarcation between good and evil, but that too is a fairly obvious observation that has been done to death.

I too imagine it would be better had I read the graphic novel. For starters you would be privy to the complicated backstories and layers of subtlety that the story, no doubt, had. Secondly, there's sort of a "Woah, it's my imagination up on the big screen" factor. Your brain would sort of fill in the gaps that people like me, who for all intents and purposes had never even heard of the watchmen, miss out on.
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matt.jpgMatt - Washington Bureau Chief
03/09/2009 @ 10:06:48 PM
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I'll just start by saying that I liked the movie. It had its faults (the violence was too graphic, it dragged on during the middle, and yes, the "blue dong"), but overall, I enjoyed it. That said, since I had read the book before hand (and fairly recently at that), I'm not sure I can completely "fault" Jeremy for having the reaction that he did. I went into the movie not only knowing what would happen, but also knowing all of the background and details that were in the book, but not in the movie. So, where someone like Jeremy would see moments that don't seem to have a purpose, my mind would "fill in" what wasn't shown and I wouldn't have the same problem. This isn't to say that I would have hated it as much as Jeremy if I hadn't read it before (I might have, I might not have), just that I can't know.

This does bring me, though, to the one area where the film makers could have done better. The movie is pretty faithful to the comic, and at over 2 1/2 hours a lot of the original story made it to the screen. There was, however, also a lot that didn't. Apparently pretty much everything from the comic was filmed, so a lot had to be cut just to get it down to what they did. This was probably a situation where the background/sub-plots/"extras" should have been an all or nothing type of proposition. Since they couldn't include it all, cutting the film even more and streamlining the main story might have made a more enjoyable movie for those who were unfamiliar with the story. As a side note, some people are already looking forward to the "Director's Cut" editions that will include pretty much everything. While I doubt Jeremy would want to spend any more of his time watching this, it would be interesting to see if his opinion changed at all if he saw the full story.

Another point I'll make regarding the faithfulness of the movie to the comics, is that the "graphic novel" is really told in 12 chapters which were originally published in 12 individual issues. While I read that it was always understood that they would be collected as a whole, it still reads as somewhat episodic. The chapters are really set up kind of like episodes of the first few seasons of Lost, where each episode would advance the overall story a little bit, while also focusing on one of the characters and their back story (through flashbacks). While this works for Lost and for the Watchmen comics, I guess I can see how the flashbacks could seem pointless in a non-episodic movie.

Since that's now out of the way, let me get to some of the more specific criticisms from Jeremy [Spoilers Below]:

"First, as a bit of background, I enjoy Superhero movies, I'm not a comic book reader, but it's not the genre of movies that bothers me."

While it has superheroes in it, I'm not sure I would call this a superhero movie, at least not one that anyone is used too. While this is part of what made it a "groundbreaking" story in 1986, I think some people went into the movie thinking expecting one thing, and got something completely different. I'm not saying this is true in Jeremy's case, but I've read that others have had that reaction, so I thought I would throw it out.


"The over arching theme of the movie, that humans are too violent/barbaric/selfish/stupid for their own good, and thus need protecting from themselves, has been done to death."

Again, it's tough for me to separate what I know from reading the book and stuff about the book, from what information comes through from just watching the movie, but I don't think this is the point at all. One of the initial ideas of the story was to answer "what would superheroes be like in the real world", and the final story evolved from that. As such, the "heroes" in the story are all as troubled as the "normal" people in society. They're as unfit to "save" humanity as anyone is. [Spoiler] Maybe this didn't come across as well in the movie, but I don't think the ending is supposed show Ozymandias as the hero. Maybe the point was to make the reader/viewer decide whether Rorschach or Ozy was the hero, but I think it's more likely that Ozy was meant as a villain. While his plan worked in the short term, it's hinted at that it's doomed to fail in the long term as Rorschach's journal is out there to be discovered. And if not that, the final words that "nothing ever ends", implies that people/governments will never really stop being in conflict and that sooner or later we'd be right back on the brink of destruction. Granted, this is hinted at a little clearer in the book in this conversation at the end:

"Adrian Veidt: I did the right thing, didn't I? It all worked out in the end.
Dr. Manhattan: 'In the end'? Nothing ends, Adrian. Nothing ever ends."


"There was also a big reveal and a twist at the end that were so not shocking that I felt confused. When it's revealed to Laurie who her father was I was just like "Wait, we didn't know that? I swear we knew that already. Maybe it's just that SHE didn't know? Then again, this has all the makings of a typical 'dun dun DUNNN!!' movie twist scene."

I can't remember if I was totally surprised or if I had a hunch while reading the book, but I did think that they revealed their hand a bit too much during the movie.


"[Big Ending Spoiler Alert Continued]When the "this guy is being too good" character betrays everyone I was massively underwhelmed. First off, there was heavy foreshadowing. Well, as much as there can be in the 3 minutes of screen time they spent developing the character. You got the feeling that this was supposed to be a "Kevin Spacey is Keyser Soze" type reveal. In reality it was more of a "Kevin Spacey is the killer in Se7en" type reveal, in that you were like "yeah, ok, well, we barely knew him as anything else." To their credit, they did try throwing you off the scent once, and perhaps the story it self isn't as original as they thought. You know the guy is up to no good 2 seconds into his first screen apperance."

I figured he was the bad guy while reading, mainly because he was introduced and then nothing really happened with him for awhile, which is usually a big tip-off. In the movie, you got a little of this, as well as the other foreshadowing/acting weird. In the end, I don't think the "who" was supposed to be as shocking as the "why"/"how".


Also, I don't need to see that blue dong 200 times.

I agree. While I get that it's supposed to show his withdrawal from humanity (in the flashbacks he covers up, in the present he doesn't see the need to anymore), they made the point in other ways, and even if they still felt it was vital, they could have shown it once or twice and be done with it.
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Matt edited this 2 times, last at 03/09/2009 10:08:40 pm
thumbnailCAW1I0O3.gifMatt - Nutcan.com's MBL
03/09/2009 @ 10:39:03 PM
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Jeremy, whatever you thought of the rest of the movie, did you at least like the opening credit sequence? I thought it was great, although again, it probably comes across even better when you know the story.

For anyone interested, you can see it here:

Watchmen opening title sequence
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Matt edited this 2 times, last at 03/09/2009 10:40:30 pm
jeremy.jpgJeremy - 8986 Posts
03/09/2009 @ 11:29:16 PM
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Yes, that was cool, but that just brings me to another criticism that I'll consider mild but others have gotten pretty cantankerous about: The soundtrack is really strange. With the exception of the above clip, the "normal" music just seems really really weird, and not in a "This is an interesting contrast" sort of way.
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fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - Always thinking of, but never about, the children.
03/10/2009 @ 12:44:07 AM
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Matt Wrote - Yesterday @ 10:06:48 PM
While it has superheroes in it, I'm not sure I would call this a superhero movie, at least not one that anyone is used too. While this is part of what made it a "groundbreaking" story in 1986, I think some people went into the movie thinking expecting one thing, and got something completely different. I'm not saying this is true in Jeremy's case, but I've read that others have had that reaction, so I thought I would throw it out.


Fair enough, I just meant that I'm not some guy who only likes foreign films that alternate between black and white shots of a wilting flower and an old man with a single tear on his cheek for 45 minutes.

I've read a bunch of other opinions and one person that loved the comics but didn't like the movie pointed out, along your "perhaps they stayed a little too true to the comic" line of thought, that in comic books the characters have to talk a certain way, because there's only so much the animation/facial expressions/etc can say, only so much room to say it, and not only that, the words are read, so they are processed a bit differently. To actually TALK that way (or hear the lines aloud), however, often times sounds ridiculous. I don't know if that makes any sense, and again I'm not a comic reader, but I imagine there's some truth to that. This isn't an example from the movie, but just a lame example off the top of my head, it probably wouldn't be too weird to actually have a person in a comic "yell," "I'm so angry!!" To actually have a character SAY that in movie form that would sound really stupid/lazy.

Edit: I know that in certain cases saying "I'm so angry" wouldn't be completely ridiculous. Just, in general, movies offer the opportunity to be a little subtler with emotions and other such things, so things that are "spelled out" a bit more in comic form, because they have to be, come across bizarre/redundant/drawn-out in movie form.
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Jeremy screwed with this 3 times, last at 03/10/2009 1:57:32 am
fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - The pig says "My wife is a slut?"
03/10/2009 @ 01:46:31 AM
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Also, in the book do they cover more of what is the opening title sequence? Why the people are killed/locked up? I feel like the opening sequence itself could have been a movie.

While we're (not) on the subject, why does it always seem to be a plot point in anything that has a masked crime fighter that the public always unites under the belief that the person is a "Vigilante" that must be punished. This always seemed to me as (other than the Superhumans) the most far fetched notion, yet it seems to be the one thing every writer agrees upon. Coincidentally, the Watchmen seem to be the one case where the notion holds SOME merit, as these people are often NOT heroic, but they still do a lot of visible good and most of their misdeeds are behind closed doors (or after the public already turned, at which point they needed "protecting from themselves). They still ended Vietnam, save people from fires, etc. I suppose there might be some truth to the notion that Heroes and X-Men has touched on, that eventually the public would become afraid of being "overrun," but that can only play in a "many many mutant/you never know who is one" type universe. However, even then I think we'd all pretty much accept that the only thing that can save us from the evil mutants are the good mutants. There would really be no other way to even play the situation. At any rate, I'm certainly not so sure the we'd really turn on the Spidermans and Batmans of the world. We make idols out of all sorts of d-bags who don't deserve it at all, I find it hard to believe we'd watch them save the day over and over, then call for their heads, even in our fickle, what have you done for us lately society. Then again, perhaps I'm wrong, people in WI treated Favre like a deity for 17 years, then, for the most part, turned their back on him, most of whom as an overreaction to a mostly exaggerated rumor.
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Jeremy edited this 5 times, last at 03/10/2009 5:42:45 pm
thumbnailCAW1I0O3.gifMatt - 3387 Posts
03/10/2009 @ 05:29:38 PM
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You get a little more detail about the events shown in the opening, but not much more. In the first issue/chapter of the book Rorschach give a quick rundown about what happened to the other heroes, and that part did make it into the movie. Also in the comic, after each issue/chapter there was a couple of pages of mostly text that were presented as excerpts from various sources in the "Watchmen universe" (e.g. chapters of the original Nite Owl's book, Rorschach's psych profile, etc.). In the excerpts from the Nite Owl book, you get a brief history of the Minutemen and its members, but its still not a lot of info. I think you were just supposed to know that there were these "heroes" and this is what happened to them (one went insane, one got his cape stuck in a door and was shot, one was shot by an "adversary" possibly because she was a lesbian, Sally Jupiter got pregnant and retired, etc.). Now that I think on this, I realize that this was probably done to set up the whole "superheroes in a real world" theme and to show that the fates of the heroes in this world were unlike those that most readers were used to.
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Matt edited this 2 times, last at 03/11/2009 12:38:48 am
wendy.gifWendy
03/16/2009 @ 06:37:50 AM
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Has anyone read what the Watchmen-the-graphic-novel fans think of this adaptation? All the previews I read had Snyder saying he tried to keep as true to the original material as he could, and I know there was a lot of anticipation. I'm just curious - I mean, I know what you who have read it have been saying, just wondering what the general feeling was for the fans.
I thought it would be a good movie and was somewhat disappointed, I was really surprised that Shaun liked it as much as he did.
And even though of course you have to suspend reality to walk into any movie, I had to giggle at some of the lines like "Remember what you said to me ... when we were on Mars?" That's just beyond ...
I actually liked the opening sequence sad as it kind of was ... it's like the dark version of the incredibles ...
Rorschach was my fav ... Shaun thinks Jackie Earle Hayley "is Danny Bonaduce but with acting skills"

And finally ... Jeremy, I am done apologizing for Very Bad Things.
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jeremy.jpgJeremy - 8986 Posts
03/16/2009 @ 01:57:10 PM
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There's a large thread about it on Something Awful. The general consensus is disappointment/indifference with a definite trend between reading the comic and enjoying the movie. A lot of people also add to their comment that they can easily see why most people who never read the comic didn't like the movie. Obviously people enjoyed it all along a spectrum from worst movie ever to best movie ever, but most people were just north or south from "Meh." Most of the discussion was how the movie found itself in sort of a no man's land. Too true to the comic to be an enjoyable movie, but just enough changed to where it's not a letter for letter adaptation for the "true fans" either. (Like, for example, the fact that the characters don't really have superpowers (other than Dr. M) is sort of made fuzzy about 2 seconds into the assassination scene.)

Also, regarding "Very Bad Things," I don't recall you needing to apologize, but you did use my words in your North school paper review of the movie. (I think I said something like "The whole movie was just people screaming over top of one another. It was like living in an abusive household for 20 years all crammed into 2 hours.") What would you do if you didn't have my words to use? At what point to I need to join some sort of writer's union?

Sarah and I watched "Wanted" last night. Speaking of "you have to suspend reality" it turns out the whole concept of "curving a bullet" is, by a wide margin, the most realistic act in the movie.
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Jeremy screwed with this 3 times, last at 03/16/2009 2:06:35 pm
reign_of_fire.jpgMicah - 584 Posts
03/16/2009 @ 03:31:34 PM
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Jeremy Wrote - Today @ 02:57:10 PM

Sarah and I watched "Wanted" last night. Speaking of "you have to suspend reality" it turns out the whole concept of "curving a bullet" is, by a wide margin, the most realistic act in the movie.


Are you making a conscious effort to watch horrible movies, or was it just the only thing available in the red box? Do they have red boxes in Eau Claire?
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jeremy.jpgJeremy - Always thinking of, but never about, the children.
03/16/2009 @ 03:39:27 PM
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Sarah's dad lent us a bunch of DVD's because we lent him some of ours. I think we bought it for him at some point. Parents are hard to buy for so mom gets some random knick-nack and dad gets the newest big action movie released.

It was truly truly awful though, and I'm usually able to enjoy everything, and even if not enjoying it per se, I still want to see how it ends. Lately though I find myself hating lots of movies and not caring about turning it off.

Edit: Have you actually seen Watchmen and Wanted, Micah?

Edit2: As for the "Red box" are you talking about the random vending machine style DVD rental things at McDonalds (and I assume other places)? If so, there's one in Hudson, not sure about EC, but I drive through in the rare insances I go to McD's.
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Jeremy perfected this 5 times, last at 03/16/2009 3:55:12 pm
reign_of_fire_150.jpgMicah - They just want the damn ash of that field
03/16/2009 @ 03:56:14 PM
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I have seen neither and don't intend to. My comment was actually restricted to Wanted, as I really just don't care one way or the other about most superhero movies. So yes, I am definitely passing judgment on a movie I haven't seen but I have to get pretty far down the list of movies to see before Wanted pops up, based entirely on the preview.

Speaking of movies, I recently rewatched the Man With No Name trilogy for the first time in a very long time, including the 3 hour version of The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. I generally have a really hard time with 3-hour movies, but I could watch those over and over. GB & U has one of the best climax scenes ever.
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fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - Broadcast in stunning 1080i
03/16/2009 @ 04:05:47 PM
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Well, Wanted seemed like it might be a decent guilty pleasure type movie. I didn't go into it thinking I'd be wondering how it was overlooked for best picture. I just thought there'd be some ass kicking and explosions and whatnot, and a few "oh, yeah right" type scenes. Turns out a movie about a team of assassins that read binary code from the weaving errors that a giant loom creates to determine who to kill next is as stupid as it sounds.
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reign_of_fire.jpgMicah - 584 Posts
03/16/2009 @ 04:10:57 PM
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Red Box - yes that is what I am talking about. I used to use them all the time in New York as they were $1 per movie, had current releases, and would constantly email you codes for free movies.

You'll get no argument about guilty pleasures from the guy whose icon is Matthew McConaughey jumping with an ax at a dragon. Although that movie did win the Onion's award for best post-apocalyptic movie featuring dragons of the year.

I will now go through all my posts and add wikipedia links for every noun.
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Micah screwed with this 3 times, last at 03/16/2009 4:13:01 pm
fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - 8986 Posts
03/16/2009 @ 04:23:04 PM
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http://www.redbox.com/Locations/KioskResults.aspx?zipcode=54703&radius=5&results=10&address=&city=&state=&vendor=

I wonder how low maintenance you could make those? Does someone actually come load the new dvd's in? It would be cool to start a "burn on demand" type thing that someone just loaded blank dvds into and it burned a copy, if need be, and all someone had to do to put a new movie in was push the files to it remotely.
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Jeremy messed with this at 03/16/2009 4:32:15 pm
vignette.bmpCarlos44ec - You had me at "Hello"
03/17/2009 @ 08:54:00 AM
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Micah Wrote - Yesterday @ 03:31:34 PM
Jeremy Wrote - Yesterday @ 01:57:10 PM
Sarah and I watched "Wanted" last night. Speaking of "you have to suspend reality" it turns out the whole concept of "curving a bullet" is, by a wide margin, the most realistic act in the movie.
Are you making a conscious effort to watch horrible movies, or was it just the only thing available in the red box? Do they have red boxes in Eau Claire?


Forget the RedBox, Netflix is the shiznit.

EDIT- Netflix plus Handbrake is the shiznit. Otherwise NF is just the shizz
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Carlos44ec messed with this at 03/17/2009 8:54:29 am
jeremy.jpgJeremy - Broadcast in stunning 1080i
03/17/2009 @ 09:36:12 AM
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Netflix sounds like it would be cool, but we pay way too much for all the movie channels to justify paying for some other service. Though, I did consider skipping them with direct tv, just downloading the shows we want, and signing up for netflix.
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wendy.gifWendy - 163 Posts
03/17/2009 @ 06:25:38 PM
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Jeremy Wrote - Yesterday @ 04:05:47 PM
Well, Wanted seemed like it might be a decent guilty pleasure type movie. I didn't go into it thinking I'd be wondering how it was overlooked for best picture. I just thought there'd be some ass kicking and explosions and whatnot, and a few "oh, yeah right" type scenes. Turns out a movie about a team of assassins that read binary code from the weaving errors that a giant loom creates to determine who to kill next is as stupid as it sounds.


For some unknown reason, Shaun is about to kill whomever is associated with this movie, since the first time he saw the promo for the movie and the whole "curve the bullet" thing. I'm glad the DVD commercials are all but off the airwaves.



Micah Wrote - Yesterday @ 03:56:14 PM
I have seen neither and don't intend to. My comment was actually restricted to Wanted, as I really just don't care one way or the other about most superhero movies. So yes, I am definitely passing judgment on a movie I haven't seen but I have to get pretty far down the list of movies to see before Wanted pops up, based entirely on the preview. Speaking of movies, I recently rewatched the Man With No Name trilogy for the first time in a very long time, including the 3 hour version of The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. I generally have a really hard time with 3-hour movies, but I could watch those over and over. GB & U has one of the best climax scenes ever.


You should go hang out w/ my dad
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wendy.gifWendy
03/17/2009 @ 06:27:01 PM
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Jeremy Wrote - Yesterday @ 01:57:10 PM
Also, regarding "Very Bad Things," I don't recall you needing to apologize, but you did use my words in your North school paper review of the movie. (I think I said something like "The whole movie was just people screaming over top of one another. It was like living in an abusive household for 20 years all crammed into 2 hours.") What would you do if you didn't have my words to use? At what point to I need to join some sort of writer's union? .


You should start copywriting what you say then ... and on that note, keep commenting on our wall - you're like our #1 poster right now and you don't even live in our DMA, high five!
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fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - Cube Phenomenoligist
03/17/2009 @ 06:52:53 PM
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I've posted twice. Unless you mean I'm #1 in the sense that my posts are vastly superior, in which case, I agree.

Wendy Wrote - Yesterday @ 06:25:38 PM
For some unknown reason, Shaun is about to kill whomever is associated with this movie, since the first time he saw the promo for the movie and the whole "curve the bullet" thing. I'm glad the DVD commercials are all but off the airwaves.


I think it's because it's one of those things that is so preposterously stupid, yet on some level oddly plausible to stupid people, so sooner or later someone is going to try it and shoot someone.

Jon could fill in the details better I'm sure, but he worked in for an after school type deal at Longfellow for a while and apparently it was a hot topic amongst the kids who didn't see any reason you couldn't curve a bullet. I think Jon was upset as well.

Edit: Though, this is one I would like to see the mythbusters tackle. I wonder what would make a bullet curve. (Ie special spin, grooves, etc, or if there's just too much force to overcome.)
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Jeremy screwed with this 4 times, last at 03/18/2009 12:17:25 am
face.bmpCarlos44ec - "Always remember that you are unique. Just like everybody else."
03/17/2009 @ 10:49:08 PM
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Wendy Wrote - Today @ 06:25:38 PM
You should go hang out w/ my dad


Some of us used to from time to time.
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reign_of_fire_150.jpgMicah - Bring me the finest muffins and bagels in all the land.
03/18/2009 @ 12:41:59 PM
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Jeremy Wrote - Yesterday @ 07:52:53 PM

Edit: Though, this is one I would like to see the mythbusters tackle. I wonder what would make a bullet curve. (Ie special spin, grooves, etc, or if there's just too much force to overcome.)


Didn't they do this by proving that shooting through water curves bullets?
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fry6beeu9.jpgJeremy - 8986 Posts
03/18/2009 @ 01:02:23 PM
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I don't think so. They've tested shooting things in water from land, and tested if a gun will fire underwater.
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jon.jpgJon - 2880 Posts
03/19/2009 @ 03:08:36 AM
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Jeremy Wrote - 03/16/2009 @ 03:39:27 PM

Edit2: As for the "Red box" are you talking about the random vending machine style DVD rental things at McDonalds (and I assume other places)? If so, there's one in Hudson, not sure about EC, but I drive through in the rare insances I go to McD's.


Dude, Walgreen's on the South Side.

Jeremy Wrote - 03/17/2009 @ 06:52:53 PM
I've posted twice. Unless you mean I'm #1 in the sense that my posts are vastly superior, in which case, I agree.


I liked this comment. Especially because I'm pretty sure you're being serious.

Jeremy Wrote - 03/17/2009 @ 06:52:53 PM

Wendy Wrote - 03/17/2009 @ 06:25:38 PM
For some unknown reason, Shaun is about to kill whomever is associated with this movie, since the first time he saw the promo for the movie and the whole "curve the bullet" thing. I'm glad the DVD commercials are all but off the airwaves.


Jon could fill in the details better I'm sure, but he worked in for an after school type deal at Longfellow for a while and apparently it was a hot topic amongst the kids who didn't see any reason you couldn't curve a bullet. I think Jon was upset as well.


I'm not sure I remember this happening, but it sounds like it might have. I wasted all my time arguing cinematic illusion with those third graders. In the end, I won them over when it came to bullets not curving, but they refused to cede any ground when it came to the culinary skills of mice.

Really though, it seems sometimes like people try stuff from movies and tv all the time. Jeremy admitted as much when it came to watching Wizard. Same thing, right? I was, and still am a bit concerned that people are gonna go curve some bullets in their backyard or do something else that wouldn't end well.
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Jon messed with this 3 times, last at 03/19/2009 3:13:22 am
jeremy.jpgJeremy - I hate our freedoms
03/19/2009 @ 09:24:35 AM
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Jon Wrote - Today @ 03:08:36 AM
Jeremy Wrote - 03/17/2009 @ 06:52:53 PM
Jon could fill in the details better I'm sure, but he worked in for an after school type deal at Longfellow for a while and apparently it was a hot topic amongst the kids who didn't see any reason you couldn't curve a bullet. I think Jon was upset as well.


Really though, it seems sometimes like people try stuff from movies and tv all the time. Jeremy admitted as much when it came to watching Wizard. Same thing, right? I was, and still am a bit concerned that people are gonna go curve some bullets in their backyard or do something else that wouldn't end well.


Well, a video game secret and firing a gun while flailing your arms wildly are a bit different, but yes, I'm sure someone has tried this and shot the person standing next to them. Also, like I said, it turns out that curving bullets is the most plausible "stunt" in the movie.
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jon.jpgJon - many posts
03/21/2009 @ 08:27:17 AM
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Jeremy Wrote - 03/19/2009 @ 09:24:35 AM

Well, a video game secret and firing a gun while flailing your arms wildly are a bit different,


When I said "Same thing, right?" it was facetious.
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